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Archive for May, 2017

WSOP November Nine is No More, Final Table Returns to Summer

When it was announced a decade ago that the World Series of Poker (WSOP) Main Event final table would be moved to November, rather than directly following the preceding days of the tournament, many jaws in the poker community dropped. To many, it was an intriguing idea, meant to allow ESPN to build up the excitement leading up to the final table, but to others, it was sacrilege. We have grown accustomed to the November Nine, though, which is why it may come as a shock to hear that it is no more. Starting this year, the Main Event final table will be contested in July following a two day break once the composition of the final table is determined. This sudden change is the result of a deal between ESPN and Poker Central which sees Poker Central acquiring both the television broadcast and digital media rights to the World

Daniel Daniyar Takes Down WPT Amsterdam, Andreas Klatt Earns “MonteDam Swing” Championship

The World Poker Tour has wrapped up its pre-World Series of Poker schedule with the close of action at the Holland Casino in Amsterdam. As to their WPTDeepStacks Main Event, Daniel Daniyar started the day with the second biggest stack and finished it with all the chips to take the title, while Andreas Klatt celebrated an outstanding run of poker between Monte Carlo and Amsterdam to win the “MonteDam Swing.” As previously stated, Daniyar (1.8 million) started the day with the second biggest stack, trailing only Jan Jansma (2.365 million) on the leaderboard. They were the only two players above a million chips as Jorn Walthaus (845K), Louis Salter (735K), Jonathan Rozema (495K) and Shyngis Satubayev (430K) rounded out the final table on Saturday. From the start, Daniyar was on the offensive, starting a run that would only end with him winning the title. Daniyar set the tone from the

Comedian Kevin Hart to Enter 2017 Super High Roller Bowl

In its previous two seasons, the Super High Roller Bowl presented by Poker Central has had its share of businesspeople (Dan Shak, Kathy Lehne, both accomplished poker players) and poker professionals (too numerous to mention), but it has never had a “celebrity” in the mix. Some might still say that bar hasn’t been crossed but, with the announcement from Poker Central that comedian Kevin Hart will be taking part in the 2017 version of the tournament, they are drawing closer. It doesn’t seem to faze the star of Central Intelligence that he’s in for at least $ 300,000, if not more should he choose to re-enter the tournament. “I love playing high stakes poker, and there’s no better competition than at the Super High Roller Bowl – the world championship of high stakes poker,” Hart stated during the announcement of his participation. “I am looking forward to all the support

World Poker Tour Expanding Operations into India, South America With New Partnerships

The World Poker Tour has, at certain points in its history, stretched their moniker as far as “world.” For a few years, the organization barely left the States of America and, if it did, it was still on the North American continent. Of late, however, the WPT has been stretching out into the international market, as demonstrated by their latest endeavors on both sides of the globe. The WPT and India-based Adda52.com announced that they would be collaborating to expand poker in the billion-people strong country. This Asia-Pacific expansion between the two groups will be twofold, with a new tournament – the WPTDeepStacks India – as well as a brand-new honor for yearly performance in the WPT India Player of the Year award. Between both endeavors, the WPT and Adda52.com are looking to make poker even bigger in the country. “With a burgeoning poker community in a country with a

WSOP Alters “Calling Clock” Rule

The World Series of Poker has implemented a new rule for 2017 regarding how things will be handled when a player wants to “call clock” on an opponent. For those of you who are new to poker, “calling clock” or “calling the clock” is a formal process by which a player asks that a floor person force another player to make a decision on a hand if that player has taken too long to act. The tricky part about calling clock has always been that it is very subjective. Who is to say, exactly, if a person is taking too long or is stalling? In one hand, protracted thought may be appropriate while it is not in another. Maybe someone who looks like they are stalling is really thinking hard. And how much time should be given by the floor? The changes are not really much more concrete than they